Takes


I stopped posting on Twitter years ago. Here are some thoughts I might have posted there had I had I still been active.

  • Outside of renaming Community Notes, it's hard to think of many ways in which Twitter is better than it was in April 2022. The bot problem is much worse, the algorithm prioritizes inferior content (ex. threads, blue-check replies), and the ad monetization payouts further incentizive fake news and engagement bait.
  • It seems bad that Twitter, Shopify, and Substack all have "Nazi problems".
  • people complaining about negative tech coverage should simply stop doing things easy to criticize
  • I am paying more attention to the enshittification of things.
  • I've seen at most one web3 use case that's intrinsically better (not just for the reason that it uses a blockchain).
  • It's a huge red flag for me when someone follows politics like it's sports.
  • I'm open to changing my mind on this, but I haven't read anything convincing from a trustworthy source about why seed oils are actually bad for you.
  • Electric cars have not yet reached the point where they are a net benefit to society. I hope we can figure it out in time.
  • Tesla safety issues merit more serious investigation by the government. They appear disproportionately likely to be involved in avoidable deaths.
  • Self-driving cars probably win in the long run. But I think we need a better plan to balance fine-tuning and safety risks.
  • I get why people like Elon, or what he stands for. It's delusional to not acknowledge his faults, though. I'll have more to say here.
  • I would bike everywhere if I could feel safe in doing so.
  • I am increasingly less sold on having a salaried position instead of being paid for projects + success.
  • Being a digital nomad was something that interested me for a while. I'll have more to say on this soon.
  • One of the biggest letdowns at Wharton was that I was very excited for management classes and found that they were largely useless. The professors were all very bright but the subject matter was a mix of personality-test-astrology and appeal to authority on companies that made their way into Harvard Business Review case studies.
  • It's been six years and I'm still laughing at the Wharton management professor who 1) said employees using Bridgewater Associates for sexual harrassment didn't indicate anything bad about Bridgewater's culture because Bridgewater was still profitable 2) had an exam essay prompt about how Elon Musk was flabbergasted at people accusing him of being anti-union at Tesla and we had to help him with an internal comms strategy to dispel that notion.
  • I like the idea of business books. I just wish I didn't find most of them boring.
  • I apply more skills into my day to day in career from poker than from Wharton. Have a post on this in the drafts.
  • Our brains often struggle to remember sources of consumed information. Therefore, if we can identify information that leads us to make worse decisions, we should try to avoid consuming similar information in the future. This doesn't mean at all to ignore differing opinions, as reading well-formed new thoughts are a big part of learning. This is, however, part of why I aggressively mute and block on Twitter.
  • For similar reasons, I unfollow and mute/block people who engagement farm and say things that they don't believe.